PODCAST GUEST APPEARANCE ON STARTUP FASHION WEEK TORONTO

Earlier this month we had the pleasure of being featured by Startup Fashion Week Toronto. A big thanks to Jodi Goodfellow for making that happen. Their Van Gogh exhibit had to be cancelled due to COVID, but give them a follow to see all the cool things they're doing and stay up to date for their other events throughout the year.

A transcription of our podcast is below.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Welcome to the startup Fashion Week front row podcast where we will give listeners exclusive content inside the crazy world of fashion. My name is Jodi Goodfellow, founder and producer of startup Fashion Week. And today we have a guest from Toronto, who's determined to help the fashion industry here in Canada improve. We are talking to Josiah who recently launched an online platform to help Toronto brands get noticed called Koda Collective. Welcome, Josiah.

Josiah Crocker   

Thank you. Thank you for having me. I appreciate the time.

Jodi Goodfellow

I'm really excited to talk about Koda Collective and give our listeners a little bit of insight as to what you're working on, and how you're helping small businesses and even larger businesses in the Toronto Community. I think it's so important. I think it's really great what you're doing. So let's just dive into this conversation. So for a lot of people who start businesses in fashion, often they take an unconventional pathway, and often aren't necessarily from the fashion industry. So tell us about your journey into the world of creating this new business Koda Collective. Did you have any experience in the fashion industry before? Is this something completely new and different? Tell us about your journey.

Josiah Crocker   

Yeah, it's definitely new and different for me. I come from a restaurant real estate background so pretty far from far removed from the fashion world. But I had a friend here in Ontario, who had been trying to get his own clothing company off the ground for quite a few years and we kind of reconnected recently. He had asked for some help and  just sort of through helping him and navigating the ins and outs of all the obstacles that people go through trying to launch a fashion brand, I learned pretty quickly that it's really, really hard. There isn't necessarily great support systems out there. That was sort of the big concern for me that there wasn't a lot of support that was readily available for entrepreneurs and people new to the fashion world. So, when I was helping him, I said “Well, why don't you just go on to a local marketplace or something like that?” And he was like, “That's not a thing” and that kind of surprised me just being Toronto and it being progressive, and sort of digital forward. So when I did some research and  talking to a few designers, the consensus was that this wasn't something that had been done before. Or if it had been done before, it wasn't around anymore. So I thought, you know, if no one else is going to do it, I'll give it a try.

Jodi Goodfellow   

That's amazing. So you saw an opportunity and you also saw a problem that needed to be solved. And I think that's how a lot of businesses get started, right. It's not something you intended to do, but just kind of all fell into place. That's pretty amazing. So now that you have launched Koda Collective to help Toronto brands get their name out there and get noticed, tell our listeners what Koda Collective is.

Josiah Crocker 

So Koda Collective is an online marketplace, where we only sell local fashion brands. So we kind of like to describe ourselves as H&M but for local brands only. So by going to our site, you can shop and browse collections from many different designers all locally owned. It just gives Canadian customers, even more specifically, Toronto, a really comprehensive place they can come to and know that every shirt they buy or scarf that they wear is supporting someone right in their community.

Jodi Goodfellow

Yeah, that's pretty awesome. I love that you're doing this to support local. I think that's really important. Do you have a team? Or are you just a one man show right now?

Josiah Crocker   

I think that a lot of the designers out there can probably identify with me --  I am just a one man show right now. That's usually how it starts, I think for most people, it's a tough industry to make it into. And I would love to get to a point and I think we will, where we can start bringing in more team members. But for now it's just me cold calling and knocking on doors and talking with great people like you and hopefully building something really incredible.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, that's amazing. And tell us about some of the brands that you're currently working with on Koda Collective.

Josiah Crocker   

We have some really great brands that we're working with. What was really important to us when we started was really that we worked with a really diverse group of people, both in the individual designers that are running the companies, and also in the styles and sizes of the company. So we have designers we work with like Lex Brown with Neoteny. She does cut and sew right here in the GTA. And a lot of it is repurposed materials. They like to call it slow fashion, which I think is a really cool sort of trend that's catching on with not over-producing. And then we work with some other brands like Team LTD, who's a little bit more established and in the lifestyle sector so we have quite a range.

Jodi Goodfellow   

No, that's amazing. It sounds like you have a range. So it's not like it's limited to a certain style or anything like that you have a range of different designers that you're working with, which is great.

Josiah Crocker   

Definitely, we didn't want to discriminate. And we wanted to really provide all levels of experience with a platform to create a kind of an equal opportunity to succeed.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Okay, cool. So we have a lot of listeners who have their own fashion brand. So can you tell us what the benefits are for brands or designers who are maybe curious about aligning with Koda Collective? What are the benefits overall?

Josiah Crocker   

Yeah, I think the big benefit is sort of a cross pollination effect that we're trying to go with. The big benefit up front for people who join our site is that you're kind of getting an audience you wouldn't normally have access to. So designer A joins, designers B,C & D joins and all of a sudden, everybody's customers are starting to kind of see everybody else's designs. It really widens that net for people. So someone comes on our site to buy a hoodie from one of our designers like Barracks Co., but they might like pants that go with that from one of our other designers like Revamped Clothing, who does re-purpose one of ones. And so there's a really great effect, because fashion is not just one piece, it's an entire look and oftentimes you put looks together from multiple brands. I think that that's something that we can really  connect on our platform.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah, so definitely, there's that piece of being able to tap into a new audience. That's always a big benefit for designers and brands because that's what they're looking for at the end of the day, right is to find new customers and  build relationships with new customers and stuff like that. So that's really cool. Um, so do designers who want to, you know, sell their products on Koda Collective, do they need to have a website already? Because I know some of our designers, they sometimes just use Etsy, or maybe if they're really early stages or if they just do custom pieces, they just use Instagram to start their business. So how necessary is it for them to have a website in order to also sell their items on Koda Collective?

Josiah Crocker  

So that would be the only limitation we've really run into, as far as building out this platform is we are Shopify based and our ability to really connect inventories and collections from all of our designers, it does require them to be on Shopify as well. So we do require a Shopify website  if you want to connect with us directly. It just makes it a lot better experience for our customers, especially. Because as we all know inventory tracking and all that kind of stuff, it can be a little bit of a headache and just working through Shopify, we're able to keep everybody's inventory, live and in real time, and it just creates a good experience for the customer. 

Jodi Goodfellow   

Okay, so cool. So that means that, you know, if I'm a designer, and I have my own website, I have a Shopify website, I align with Koda Collective, and I'm selling, you know, I'm promoting maybe 10 pieces on Koda Collective. If something sells on Koda Collective, it doesn't mess up my inventory, then? So your website is able to communicate to mine to say this item has now been sold?

Josiah Crocker   

Exactly. There's a real time connection with all of our vendors that we work with, usually it's within 30 seconds. So if you sold a T shirt on your site, our inventory updates, and vice versa. So there's never an inconsistent experience for the customer and that was really important to us.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, that is important because I know like some designers they struggle with that. They use different platforms, right to create visibility. Sometimes they use their own website, then they have an Etsy account, and then they maybe try to sell on Amazon or somewhere else who knows, but they don't really connect with one another. And so there's a lot of challenges with trying to keep up and making sure everything is updated. So that's a really great tool to have, and to know about for sure. And of course, designers, they always want to know about cost. So is there a cost right now for them to connect their inventory to Koda Collective or to be on the platform right now?

Josiah Crocker   

There's not an initial cost that we charge for anybody. So any designers that join up with us, we just want everybody to get settled in, integrated, get a feel for the platform.That was really important to us because that's the whole point of being sustainable is, if we started taking money from people right away, it kind of defeats the purpose of what we're trying to do, which is support the growth and success of these brands. 

Jodi Goodfellow

Wow, I love that. That sounds very authentic. And I think that's what Toronto needs is a lot more authenticity in this industry. It's very challenging to come across, you know, other businesses and other people who are authentically looking to help and support and, you know, accelerate business for everyone in this industry so I'm really excited about that. And how does it work with, let's say, for example, if a designer has products on your website, if something sells out, does the designer have access to the back end, maybe to add new items? How does that work?

Josiah Crocker   

So the platform and the app that we're working with, that's sort of what makes everything kind of run the way that it does. And part of that is our designers as well as myself as the destination and sort of the boutique shop, we each have our own dashboards. And within those dashboards, we can sync and un-sync inventories with one another. The added benefit to all of this is that there's no extra work on the designers part once they're connected to us. We sync in real time when we add in real time. So if they change a product image and they checked our website it would be updated there as well. They don't have to communicate it to us, the app does all the work, and it automatically reflects it in real time on our site.

Jodi Goodfellow 

That's amazing. That sounds so simple. I love it. And I know that designers will love that because often a) they’re so stressed for time and everything else that they don't have time to deal with all this stuff so they love simplicity. And I know also another challenge is often designers, they aren’t very tech savvy. So knowing that there is that integration, it really definitely helps and eases anxiety that this isn't going to be a complicated thing. So well done. That's amazing. I love how easy this sounds for everybody. And so I'm curious with Koda Collective, like, overall, what was your intended vision?

Josiah Crocker  

Our vision is kind of three parts:  we have the short term, the long term, and then the super lofty goals -- I think it's still important to have those. So in the short term, it's very much to get a Toronto GTA platform up and running, that people can really come to rely on, both as a designer and as a consumer, and know that the quality that you're finding there is good, it's reliable, and to know that you're supporting a local, so there's no questioning in the mind of the customer, you know “where's my money going? what am I really supporting here?” It's all local communities, it could be your neighbor that you're supporting. So we really wanted to build that out in Toronto. So that's our short term plan. Long term is we want to really go Canada wide, so that we can have a comprehensive Canadian solution. No matter where you are in Canada and wanting to support your local province or local city, we want to give everybody a really full alternative to something like H&M or Amazon that they can rely on and know that they're supporting what they care about.

Jodi Goodfellow 

Yeah, it's so true. Like, just to be honest, the other day I was at my stretch therapy and my stretch therapist, I'll give them a little shout out at physioDNA. And my stretch therapist, he was saying, you know, that he really wanted to support more local Toronto brands, but, um, he just was so frustrated, he doesn't know where to find them. That's kind of the challenge, I think that a lot of consumers face is just not knowing where they are. Right? So I think this kind of helps with that challenge, and maybe more consumers will be able to pay attention, you know, and learn more about you know, all the cool brands that we have here in Toronto by going into this one place and finding out you know, new brands to support. I love it. I think it's amazing.

Josiah Crocker 

Yeah, I don't think there's ever a shortage of people who want to do good and want to you know, kind of quote on quote, do the right thing. But I think you have to really make it, at least the beginning, you have to really make it easy for people to tap into that and support the right things and that's what we're really trying to do is to make it really easy for everybody.

Jodi Goodfellow   

So will you be aligning with any special partners or charities down the road?

Josiah Crocker 

Yeah, this is something that was really important to us, when we first launched the platform was finding that social aspect to it. Right now, we're looking into different charities and groups that support the environment as a whole, just for Earth. And so we're looking at donating a percentage of all profits to that. What we're trying to do, though, is actually give our customers a way to track how much they've contributed to that as an individual as well, so people can actually see, oh, I, you know, my purchases on this platform have planted, you know, 20 trees or something like that.

Jodi Goodfellow 

Yeah, a lot of consumers, they're more aware right now. And, and they have that, you know, interest to support brands that are doing good beyond just, you know, their product or business or whatever. So, I think that's really cool you're thinking that far ahead. And that you actually have a plan and, and have it figured out. I also think that, you know, consumers within the fashion industry, they're really good about being educated and a little more aware about sustainability and efforts of sustainability. So I think that's a really nice touch as well.


Josiah Crocker   

Thank you. Yeah, a lot of the brands we work with are repurposed fabrics, and slow fashion and sustainable fashion and so we really wanted to tap into that sentiment and speak to our designers as well, that we do care about the environment. That that’s something we are going to be looking at.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, definitely. And there's a lot going on in the fashion industry, even outside of Toronto, just all over Canada. So how can the rest of Canada benefit because right now, you're onboarding a lot of Toronto brands? So do you have any vision to you know, work with designers outside of Toronto at some point? And of course, I'm guessing, you know, anyone can purchase and support from Koda Collective, so consumers can come from anywhere, but how can we make this more holistic?

Josiah Crocker 

Yeah, that's, that's the vision, right? To get holistic, and really give Canada, not just Toronto an option. So Toronto, we're very much building it out to kind of prove the concept and build some recognition and credibility within the industry. And then the plan is 100%, to move across the country, and have a full array of options for Canadians from all provinces. Things that Canadians can do right now, in the meantime, really start kind of looking at your local community and searching out those designers and those business owners that you can support until we get there.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, exactly. And I love that, you know, again, like support is such a big thing, because in the fashion industry, at least here in Toronto, I've noticed that a lot of people do work in silos, and like you were saying earlier on, like, it's, it's very difficult to find the right resources when you're starting a business. Because in the fashion industry, people do work in silos. And I think that having a platform like this, it brings more brands together to work as a community. I think that's really cool. And I think that's a great way to start looking at fashion is you know, that we should stop looking at each other as competitors sometimes and maybe just look at how can we work together?

Josiah Crocker  

100%. And that's something that we've kind of really made a point of emphasis, just with the designers we're working with right now. We do have a group chat where everybody can kind of talk to each other.So every design that we bring on there, they're added to our group chat and, and we have so many different designers who have so many different areas of expertise, that there's a really a wealth of knowledge and information. So people get to share with one another and say, you know, hey, if you're looking to bring your manufacturing to Canada here, I've already done it, here's how you can do it. 

Jodi Goodfellow   

Oh my goodness, really wow, that's, that's amazing, because I love hearing that designers share. Because it doesn't happen very often in this community.

Josiah Crocker   

It can be like pulling teeth sometimes and sometimes you really gotta sit down and explain the benefits of it. Working with some great brands and people have been really good about it.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Oh that’s so cool. Well, I love that. And I think that that will help as well, because there's, you know, a very high rate of failure in terms of fashion businesses, at least that I've seen. They come and go so frequently here in Canada. So the survival rate of fashion businesses is not the greatest. And so I think that you know, just all these little efforts that you're making to build a better community and to build a better industry, I think they can go a long way to be perfectly honest. So kudos to you. And you know, making all these really cool things happen? How do you promote the brands that are on Koda Collective?

Josiah Crocker   

Yeah, so promotions are always tough when you're first starting out. Nobody knows who you are. And you're trying to help other people who might not have a large following either. So that's sort of the “collective” part of the name Koda Collective is really engaging with our designers and getting them to kind of push the platform and explain the benefits and why people should be going there and why people should check it out. So we do work with our designers to promote. We do, you know, Instagram and Facebook ads We obviously had bigger plans before the shutdown happened, we wanted to do photo shoots and things like that. And that will come with lookbooks, and little magazine printouts and things like that.  In the meantime, it's mostly been digital and online, and engaging with, you know, great entrepreneurs and business owners like yourself, who are also interested in supporting the industry and really kind of building out that network of people.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, that's amazing. Um, do you know like, how, I mean, you obviously have a group of brands that are already on Koda Collective. Have you thought about how designers or brands might feel about being on a platform where maybe their competitors, their potential competitors are also a part of like, has that conversation even come up?

Josiah Crocker 

Oh, yeah, it comes up often. And I think the easiest way to kind of explain it to people is, if, when you go into a mall, you see a Chanel store, and you see a Louis Vuitton store, and you see all of them, and you see all these different types of stores selling very similar products. And reality is, someone might come to our store for one of our brands, t shirts, and then they might see somebody else's pair of pants. And so I don't necessarily see it as competition. I think there's enough pie for everybody. And really, it's a much more sustainable way of building businesses, because rather than somebody coming in just your storefront, just your thing is, all of a sudden, they're seeing all these other career opportunities, and vice versa. So I don't see it as competition, I actually see it as sort of, again, that cross pollination, that really symbiotic relationship of bringing, you know, people who love fashion and they're gonna see your stuff too.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, absolutely. And I'm curious, like, the fashion industry is not the easiest industry to break into. And obviously, you How long has Koda Collective been around, by the way?

Josiah Crocker  

So we've been building it since pretty much the beginning of the year, right around when COVID started. And then we just launched about two months ago, so we are definitely babies. Definitely early stages.

Jodi Goodfellow  

And so how easy or difficult has it been for you to establish credibility for Koda Collective among the industry so far? Have people been receptive? Or have they been like, you know, what, I'll wait and see how it goes first? What has the response been like so far?

Josiah Crocker  

We've gotten a whole range of responses from, you know, getting left on read all the way to people like yourself really engaging and responding really well with it. So I find that once you get someone on the phone, or you can talk to someone to really explain what you're doing, people really start to understand and get it. But yeah, it's really hard to get credibility because, yeah, I mean, the fashion industry, it can be very saturated at times. Yeah. And there's a lot out there. And so you really have to go that extra step and that extra mile, to get people to trust you and trust is so important. So yeah, it's been tough, but I rely on the goodwill of people like you to give me a chance. 

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, there are some out there.

Josiah Crocker   

There are. And I think COVID: It's a lonely time, right now for a lot of people. And I think people forget just how nice it is to talk to somebody and engage a little bit and realize that, you know, that's not my competition, that's someone else who loves the same thing that I do, and they're trying to do, you know, great things with it. And so, it's been tough but like you said, there's great people out there and it's just about finding those people and really building good relationships.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, absolutely. I agree. And you brought up, you know, COVID and everything else. And I think, you know, the fact that you're building this platform through COVID is actually pretty brave to be able to do that. But how do you see this as maybe being a benefit for Koda Collective or even for the businesses who are struggling, you know, right now through the pandemic?

Josiah Crocker  

Yeah, I think that in the last 10 years, we've seen a lot of changes in the world from, you know, automation to AI to, you know, a lot of different changes that are affecting, you know, industries as a whole, whether it's the workforce or the economy, or the fashion industry. So COVID definitely is not a good thing. It has been horrible. But I think that some good things have come from it, mostly in the way of a perspective shift or perspective change for a lot of people. You know, what's what's really important in life, what's valuable to me, or even offline versus online, and really going from brick and mortar to digital, I think it's, it's really kind of accelerated that. So it's been definitely a scary time to build a company but there are advantages where people are sort of recognizing the beauty in online shopping and the beauty of working from home and, and really tapping into beyond your front door and seeing what else is out there.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Well, and I think, something that Koda Collective, what it offers, is choice, right? And because we haven't really been able to go into shopping malls and  have that experience where we get to have choice of different stores to go into. I mean, that's one of the reasons why platforms like Amazon are so popular, because there's so many choices of things on there that you can purchase. So I think Koda Collective maybe came at the right time, because right now, that's what people are looking for. They're shopping online more, and they also want more choice and selection, right? And they also want to support local. So I think that you're definitely heading in the right direction with what you're building and what you're doing. I think it's really fantastic. And I'm curious, like, Are there any current fashion designers or fashion businesses that our audience should know about, that you've been working with that maybe they don't know about?

Josiah Crocker   

I mean, I could probably talk about any number of brands that are on our site right now. They're all fantastic people and really cool business owners. We have one designer, his name's George. And he has hats that he gets from Ghana for his brand Huri Movement. He has a Ghana background himself and he makes these beautiful, like tribal Afro, kind of inspired hat designs that are really great for a lot of reasons. They're super colourful and beautiful, they support the local community, and he also donates proceeds back home to the local Ghana community. So it's like this triple effect of like, he's giving back so I love him and what he's doing. And then we do have a couple of our re-purpose people that are awesome. We have Revamped--  Catherine she's fantastic. She does re-purpose clothing and makes these really crazy, amazing, really wild designs that are all one of ones. And I think you just really got to go to the site and see everything that we have to offer. There's so many good people on there.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, that sounds really cool. And so is there one item on there that you think is going to be a big hit for fall winter? Anything in particular that stands out?

Josiah Crocker   

Yeah, definitely. One of our new designers Carolyn Ferrara, she just joined last week and she makes these beautiful knitted, elegant pieces. So she has like these pullover long knitted sweaters that are so great for fall along with like these scarves and really just like if it's fall you're looking for, you can't go wrong checking out her stuff right now. It's awesome.

Jodi Goodfellow  

That's amazing. Okay, so now that we have everyone curious, what is the website everyone should be going to?

Josiah Crocker  

Yeah, so  it’s kodacollective.ca. That's where you can find us and it's @kodacollective on Instagram as well. 

Jodi Goodfellow   

Okay, cool. Um, so everybody's gonna be abandoning our podcast right now to go check everything out but in any case, let's finish our chat. So what advice would you give to anyone who's starting a business and fashion what I mean, because you're fresh at this, right? So tell us what are some key things that you have learned?

Josiah Crocker   

I think you got to do it for the right reasons. I think that's true in any business, you really got to know why you're getting into it. Now, for every person that, you know, has a cool picture, they decided to screen print on a T-shirt and and hope that it'll turn into a big company. There's those people who really dig into the art, the artistry that goes into fashion, and sort of the labor of love of creating really interesting pieces. So I think, definitely, if you want to get into fashion, you have to have an appreciation for it. It's something I've really come to love over the last two years. And other than that, you've got to have some perseverance or a great support system. My fiance has been very supportive during this time. And she's definitely kept me going in times when I didn't want to keep going so it really helps to have a support system.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Oh, my goodness. Yeah. It really is it really and sometimes you get support from the people who you least expect it right. Like your fiance, like she's not even part of the business or the industry, but kind of, you know, by osmosis, she's almost a business partner. Really? Right?.

Josiah Crocker  

Yeah definitely. Yeah, one of the things I've kind of found just in businesses as a whole--  I come from, I still come from an artistic background: I’m a writer, and film producer and director and I do a lot of other things like that. And one thing that really helped me on the days when I didn't want to get out of bed and do what I needed to do, having that accountability partner, when you're accountable to people and you kind of set goals, it really helps to know someone else kind of has their eye on you. And they're kind of keeping an eye on and making sure that you're really staying true to yourself. So I think that's important, too. 

Jodi Goodfellow   

Absolutely. And how is Koda Collective different from other e-commerce boutiques or marketplaces?

Josiah Crocker  

Yeah, I think as a boutique, we are similar in a lot of ways to a lot of other boutiques. But sort of the differentiating factor for us is our niche, kind of local priorities, you know, I think our priorities are in the right places. So definitely supporting local Canadians as we expand across the country in time, but in addition to that, we do have our social enterprise that we're working with giving back profits to repopulate the trees on the planet and things like that. So I think just, it's really just our value system and kind of the whys we talked about, like, why we're doing what we're doing, and doing it for the right reasons.

Jodi Goodfellow  

For sure. Yeah, that's amazing and really impressive all at the same time. Um, any last thoughts or news that you want to share with our audience at all?

Josiah Crocker   

Um, you know, I would love if people, you know, just for the benefit of the industry.. Just check out our site and really just take a look at the different people that are working out there and see what what the city has to offer, because you're really doing yourself a disservice by not checking it out, because there's so many cool things that a lot of people don't even know exists out there, because they're not looking. So do yourself a favor and just go look.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Yeah, absolutely. That's really cool. Well, thank you so much. Before I end our chat, however, I'm gonna ask you to do some fill in the blank questions. So are you ready for that?

Josiah Crocker  

Yeah, I think that'll be hopefully a little bit easier. One word answers is always good.

Jodi Goodfellow   

If you don't fill in the blank, I'll fill it in for you. How about that? 

Jodi Goodfellow 4  

So given that 2020 has been quite a year and Koda Collective has, you know, launched and everything else? By the end of 2020. You are hoping to have how many designers on Koda Collective?

Josiah Crocker   

25.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Amazing. Okay, that's fantastic. So those of you who are listening, go check out Koda Collective and if you're a designer, if you have a brand, reach out because let's help them reach their goal. Number two, your favorite shoe brand is:

Josiah Crocker   

Um, I like box fresh. They’re a sneaker company.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Interesting. Cool. Um, one word to describe Canadian fashion is:

Josiah Crocker  

Underrated. 

Jodi Goodfellow 

Oh wow, that’s a powerful word. I like it. Um, number four, one word to describe being a business owner during a pandemic is:

Josiah Crocker  

Challenging.

I think that's the only answer you really could give there.

Jodi Goodfellow   

Right? Uh, okay. Number five, the last time that you supported another creative in this industry was when?

Josiah Crocker:

Today

Jodi Goofellow 

Amazing. I love it.

Josiah Crocker:


I was on the phone with two different Canadian/Toronto designers just this morning and working with them on getting some products out there.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Fantastic. That's great. Well, thank you so much Josiah for speaking with me and sharing all your insights during startup Fashion Week. We really appreciate it. I love learning about Koda Collective and I love that you're supporting local designers and driving new business to them. I think it's fantastic. I think everything about Koda Collective is really cool. And I really hope that our listeners go check you out, well not check you out haha but check out Koda Collective.

Josiah Crocker 

They don't want to see me, but thank you. I appreciate that. I hope they do too.

Jodi Goodfellow  

Yeah, for sure. And thanks to our listeners for tuning in to the front row podcast during our seventh annual startup Fashion Week in Toronto. Feel free to email me for any topic or speaker suggestions for future episodes. info@startupfashionweek.com and don't forget to buy tickets for any other amazing events happening this week.







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